The Search for a Connection

Did you know it can still be difficult to find internet in a small town? While getting ready for our last minute, quick trip to my husband’s hometown for Gram’s funeral, we both breathed a sigh of relief remembering the new coffee shop of with internet we’d found when we visited at Christmas. No more searching for a nice place to check email and catch up on a bit of work. But to our dismay, the shop was closed—for vacation!

So we took ourselves (and our computers) to another place in town we’d used before, one which charged for Internet access. No matter, we decided. But when we arrived, the place had changed hands and was now a cafĂ© and a flower shop! We went in and asked about Internet access (actually, I asked it they had Wi-Fi and the guy said, “Huh?”). Turns out they did—when they finally found the right password to give us. But we felt bad taking up a table while just drinking tea, depriving a waitress of a party with a larger check.

Finally, on a whim, we checked the McDonald’s. Lo and behold, we were connected—and for free. We answered emails and other things in a decently comfortable booth in a completely remodeled restaurant (no playground, no red and yellow motif.) I never imagined I’d be happy to spend an afternoon at Mickie D’s after all those years of Happy Meals with my kids!


Richard Mabry said...

Isn't it amazing how quickly we become accustomed to things we didn't have until recently? Cell phones, Internet, high-speed Internet, WiFi, and the list goes on. Glad you found a McD's to connect once more.

Still trying to get used to your "new" name. I thought the old one was distinctive. Since Richard is such a common name, would you mind if I borrowed your unused "D'"?


Anne Mateer said...

Anything you need, Richard! :)

Cheryl Read said...

Being on the continent of Africa, I can relate to this in SO many ways! And, I will always call you D'Ann! Love and hugs, Cheryl

Anne Mateer said...

I'm so glad you do find the occasional connection, Cheryl! I love that we can keep up with all that is going on as you minister to the people there.

And I don't care what you call me--as long as you call me friend!